Colpetrone Rosso di Montefalco 2016  Front Label
Colpetrone Rosso di Montefalco 2016  Front LabelColpetrone Rosso di Montefalco 2016  Front Bottle Shot

Colpetrone Rosso di Montefalco 2016

    750ML / 14% ABV
    Other Vintages
    • V92
    • JS92
    All Vintages
    Out of Stock (was $18.99)
    0
    Limit Reached
    Alert me about new vintages and availability
    MyWine Share
    Vintage Alert
    Alert me about new vintages and availability
    Ships Fri, Feb 3
    Limit 0 per customer
    Sold in increments of 0
    0.0 0 Ratings
    Have you tried this? Rate it now
    (256 characters remaining)

    0.0 0 Ratings
    750ML / 14% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    The Rosso di Montefalco is intense ruby red with purple hints. It has an ample fruit nose of raspberries and hints of spices and vanilla. The palate is structured with tannins that complement the wine's roundness.
    Blend: 70% Sangiovese, 15% Sagrantino, 15% Merlot

    Critical Acclaim

    All Vintages
    Colpetrone

    Colpetrone

    View all products
    Colpetrone, Italy
    Colpetrone  Winery Image

    Còlpetrone is one of the most important wine producers in the Montefalco D.O.C.G. area. Sagrantino, the native vine of this area, is one of the most ancient varieties in Italy and the richest in tannin and polyphenolic contents. For that reason, a very particular approach to vinification is required, one that shows off the unique power of the variety without putting at risk balance and elegance. High quality breeding systems are used in the vineyards, permitting yields of 6 tons per hectare, well below those 8 tons prescribed under the rules of production. Sagrantino is produced in three different versions: Montefalco Sagrantino, Passito, a sweet red wine with an old tradition, and the selection "Gòld" that is the result of the most recent developments of this wine. Còlpetrone also produces: Montefalco Rosso D.O.C. and Grappa di Montefalco Sagrantino.

    Image for Umbrian Wine Italy content section
    View all products

    Centered upon the lush Apennine Range in the center if the Italian peninsula, Umbria is one of the few completely landlocked regions in Italy. It’s star red grape variety, Sagrantino, finds its mecca around the striking, hilltop village of Montefalco. The resulting wine, Sagrantino di Montefalco, is an age-worthy, brawny, brambly red, bursting with jammy, blackberry fruit and earthy, pine forest aromas. By law this classified wine has to be aged over three years before it can be released from the winery and Sagrantino often needs a good 5-10 more years in bottle before it reaches its peak. Incidentally these wines often fall under the radar in the scene of high-end, age-begging, Italian reds, giving them an almost cult-classic appeal. They are undoubtedly worth the wait!

    Rosso di Montefalco, on the other had, is composed mainly of Sangiovese and is a more fruit-driven, quaffable wine to enjoy while waiting for the Sagrantinos to mellow out.

    Among its green mountains, perched upon a high cliff in the province of Terni, sits the town of Orvieto. Orvieto, the wine, is a blend of at least 60% Trebbiano in combination with Grechetto, with the possible addition of other local white varieties. Orvieto is the center of Umbria’s white wine production—and anchor of the region’s entire wine scene—producing over two thirds of Umbria’s wine. A great Orvieto will have clean aromas and flavors of green apple, melon and citrus, and have a crisp, mineral-dominant finish.

    Image for Tuscan Blends content section
    View all products

    Disenchanted with Italian winemaking laws in the 1970s, a few rebellious Tuscan winemakers decided to get creative. Instead of following tradition, to bottle Sangiovese by itself, they started blending it with international varieties, namely Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Syrah in differing proportions and with amazing success. However, some Tuscan Blends don’t even include Sangiovese. Somm Secret—The suffix –aia in Italian modifies a word in much the same way –y acts in English. For example, a place with many stones (sassi) becomes Sassicaia. While not all Super Tuscan producer names end in –aia, they all share a certain coy nomenclature.

    VIYITSGCLRM7516_2016 Item# 990402

    Internet Explorer is no longer supported.
    Please use a different browser like Edge, Chrome or Firefox to enjoy all that Wine.com has to offer.

    It's easy to make the switch.
    Enjoy better browsing and increased security.

    Yes, Update Now

    Search for ""

    Processing Your Order...