Buglioni Il Vigliacco Spumante Brut Rose 2018  Front Label
Buglioni Il Vigliacco Spumante Brut Rose 2018  Front LabelBuglioni Il Vigliacco Spumante Brut Rose 2018 Front Bottle Shot

Buglioni Il Vigliacco Spumante Brut Rose 2018

    750ML / 12.2% ABV
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    750ML / 12.2% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    Bright rosé color. Fine and persistent perlage. Gently fruity bouquet with a delicate scent of flowers. Fresh, dry and savory flavors. Ideal as an apéritif, also for its appealing color. It pairs well with meat or fish appetizers and crudités, delicate first courses and grilled white meat.

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    Buglioni

    Buglioni

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    Buglioni, Italy
    Buglioni Trees Farm house Winery Image

    The Buglioni family has been making wine since 1993, when they purchased an old farmhouse surrounded by vineyards and olive groves in Corrubbio di San Pietro in Cariano in the heart of the Valpolicella Classico region. Alfredo, his wife, Gabriella, son Mariano, and Mariano's family, had been living in a larger village, and were ready to move to the more-relaxing countryside in Corrubbio di San Pietro in Cariano, one of five villages that comprise the Valpolicella Classico region. After only two months in the Buglionis' new home, and without any knowledge of how to prune, harvest or store the precious wine grapes surrounding their farmhouse, the vineyards were ready to be harvested. Initially, each vintage was a joyous event shared with friends and collaborators, but soon the Buglionis' vision and passion allowed them to dream that they could become "real" winemakers.

    Today, Buglioni owns 46 hectares (114 acres) of vines planted to the traditional indigenous varieties of Corvina, Corvinone, Rondinella, Molinara, Oseleta, Croatina and Garganega. The 14 hectares (34.6 acres) of vineyards planted near the winery are trained using the double pergola system, while the remaining vineyards in Sant’Ambrogio and San Pietro in Cariano are trained using the guyot system. The lightly textured, gravelly, dark alluvial soil, meticulous vine pruning, and scrupulous control techniques Buglioni employs ensure the production of high-quality grapes.

    The winery offers visits, tastings and overnight accommodations at the Dimora del Bugiardo. In addition, there are three Buglioni restaurants in Verona: Osteria del Bugiardo, Piscaria del Bugiardo, Locanda Buglioni.

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    Producing every style of wine and with great success, the Veneto is one of the most multi-faceted wine regions of Italy.

    Veneto's appellation called Valpolicella (meaning “valley of cellars” in Italian) is a series of north to south valleys and is the source of the region’s best red wine with the same name. Valpolicella—the wine—is juicy, spicy, tart and packed full of red cherry flavors. Corvina makes up the backbone of the blend with Rondinella, Molinara, Croatina and others playing supporting roles. Amarone, a dry red, and Recioto, a sweet wine, follow the same blending patterns but are made from grapes left to dry for a few months before pressing. The drying process results in intense, full-bodied, heady and often, quite cerebral wines.

    Soave, based on the indigenous Garganega grape, is the famous white here—made ultra popular in the 1970s at a time when quantity was more important than quality. Today one can find great values on whites from Soave, making it a perfect choice as an everyday sipper! But the more recent local, increased focus on low yields and high quality winemaking in the original Soave zone, now called Soave Classico, gives the real gems of the area. A fine Soave Classico will exhibit a round palate full of flavors such as ripe pear, yellow peach, melon or orange zest and have smoky and floral aromas and a sapid, fresh, mineral-driven finish.

    Much of Italy’s Pinot grigio hails from the Veneto, where the crisp and refreshing style is easy to maintain; the ultra-popular sparkling wine, Prosecco, comes from here as well.

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    What are the different types of sparkling rosé wine?

    Rosé sparkling wines like Champagne, Prosecco, Cava, and others make a fun and festive alternative to regular bubbles—but don’t snub these as not as important as their clear counterparts. Rosé Champagnes (i.e., those coming from the Champagne region of France) are made in the same basic way as regular Champagne, from the same grapes and the same region. Most other regions where sparkling wine is produced, and where red grape varieties also grow, also make a rosé version.

    How is sparkling rosé wine made?

    There are two main methods to make rosé sparkling wine. Typically, either white wine is blended with red wine to make a rosé base wine, or only red grapes are used but spend a short period of time on their skins (maceration) to make rosé colored juice before pressing and fermentation. In either case the base wine goes through a second fermentation (the one that makes the bubbles) through any of the various sparkling wine making methods.

    What gives rosé Champagne and sparkling wine their color and bubbles?

    The bubbles in sparkling wine are formed when the base wine undergoes a secondary fermentation, which traps carbon dioxide inside the bottle or fermentation vessel. During this stage, the yeast cells can absorb some of the wine’s color but for the most part, the pink hue remains.

    How do you serve rosé sparkling wine?

    Treat rosé sparkling wine as you would treat any Champagne, Prosecco, Cava, and other sparkling wine of comparable quality. For storing in any long-term sense, these should be kept at cellar temperature, about 55F. For serving, cool to about 40F to 50F. As for drinking, the best glasses have a stem and a flute or tulip shape to allow the bead (bubbles) and beautiful rosé hue to show.

    How long do rosé Champagne and sparkling wine last?

    Most rosé versions of Prosecco, Champagne, Cava or others around the “$20 and under” price point are intended for early consumption. Those made using the traditional method with extended cellar time before release (e.g., Champagne or Crémant) can typically improve with age. If you are unsure, definitely consult a wine professional for guidance.

    PBC9165615_2018 Item# 531720

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