Arnaldo Caprai Montefalco Rosso Riserva 2018  Front Label
Arnaldo Caprai Montefalco Rosso Riserva 2018  Front LabelArnaldo Caprai Montefalco Rosso Riserva 2018  Front Bottle Shot

Arnaldo Caprai Montefalco Rosso Riserva 2018

    750ML / 15.5% ABV
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    750ML / 15.5% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    Wild cherries preserved in spirit, chocolate, violets, vanilla and exotic spices. Full bodied and round, perfectly balanced with vibrant, velvety tannins.

    Blend: 70% Sangiovese, 15% Sagrantino, 15% Merlot

    Critical Acclaim

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    Arnaldo Caprai

    Arnaldo Caprai

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    Arnaldo Caprai, Italy
    Arnaldo Caprai Winery Video

    The family operation began in 1971 when textiles entrepreneur Arnaldo Caprai purchased 12.5 acres in Montefalco. In 1988, ownership passed on to Arnaldo’s son, Marco, who began the project to cultivate the promotion of the grape that has been growing in the Montefalco region for more than 400 years: Sagrantino. Today, the winery is the leading producer of top quality Sagrantino di Montefalco, a wine produced exclusively from this native variety. In addition to its commitment to quality, Arnaldo Caprai is recognized for its dedication to environmental, economic and social sustainability, as well as being champions for the wines of Umbria. Winery visits available for tasting.

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    Centered upon the lush Apennine Range in the center if the Italian peninsula, Umbria is one of the few completely landlocked regions in Italy. It’s star red grape variety, Sagrantino, finds its mecca around the striking, hilltop village of Montefalco. The resulting wine, Sagrantino di Montefalco, is an age-worthy, brawny, brambly red, bursting with jammy, blackberry fruit and earthy, pine forest aromas. By law this classified wine has to be aged over three years before it can be released from the winery and Sagrantino often needs a good 5-10 more years in bottle before it reaches its peak. Incidentally these wines often fall under the radar in the scene of high-end, age-begging, Italian reds, giving them an almost cult-classic appeal. They are undoubtedly worth the wait!

    Rosso di Montefalco, on the other had, is composed mainly of Sangiovese and is a more fruit-driven, quaffable wine to enjoy while waiting for the Sagrantinos to mellow out.

    Among its green mountains, perched upon a high cliff in the province of Terni, sits the town of Orvieto. Orvieto, the wine, is a blend of at least 60% Trebbiano in combination with Grechetto, with the possible addition of other local white varieties. Orvieto is the center of Umbria’s white wine production—and anchor of the region’s entire wine scene—producing over two thirds of Umbria’s wine. A great Orvieto will have clean aromas and flavors of green apple, melon and citrus, and have a crisp, mineral-dominant finish.

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    With hundreds of red grape varieties to choose from, winemakers have the freedom to create a virtually endless assortment of blended red wines. In many European regions, strict laws are in place determining the set of varieties that may be used, but in the New World, experimentation is permitted and encouraged resulting in a wide variety of red wine styles. Blending can be utilized to enhance balance or create complexity, lending different layers of flavors and aromas. For example, a red wine blend variety that creates a fruity and full-bodied wine would do well combined with one that is naturally high in acidity and tannins. Sometimes small amounts of a particular variety are added to boost color or aromatics. Blending can take place before or after fermentation, with the latter, more popular option giving more control to the winemaker over the final qualities of the wine.

    How to Serve Red Wine

    A common piece of advice is to serve red wine at “room temperature,” but this suggestion is imprecise. After all, room temperature in January is likely to be quite different than in August, even considering the possible effect of central heating and air conditioning systems. The proper temperature to aim for is 55° F to 60° F for lighter-bodied reds and 60° F to 65° F for fuller-bodied wines.

    How Long Does Red Wine Last?

    Once opened and re-corked, a bottle stored in a cool, dark environment (like your fridge) will stay fresh and nicely drinkable for a day or two. There are products available that can extend that period by a couple of days. As for unopened bottles, optimal storage means keeping them on their sides in a moderately humid environment at about 57° F. Red wines stored in this manner will stay good – and possibly improve – for anywhere from one year to multiple decades. Assessing how long to hold on to a bottle is a complicated science. If you are planning long-term storage of your reds, seek the advice of a wine professional.

    PBC9348082_2018 Item# 954244

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